It Was a Titanic of a Film

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I got suckered into seeing, again, James Cameron’s film, Titanic.

This time in IMAX 3D!

The ticket price was probably $14.00 more than when I last sat and watched this flick, back in 1997, but I got to wear really ugly looking glasses and see it on an 80 foot high screen.

Since I had agreed to go I decided to choose the 100th Anniversary of the ship’s sinking as the date and, surprisingly, the theater was not even 50% occupied.

Unlike George Lucas who likes to meddle with classic movies and screw them up by using fancy computers to “clean” all the special effects up and add annoying characters and other stupid things, Cameron doesn’t do that except for restoring unused footage.

I’ve lost touch with the people I saw Titanic with in 1997.  The theater in which we saw it has been closed (Hugh Grant drives in front of it during the movie Nine Months).  I went from being in my early-20s to my late-30s and having just moved to San Francisco to being a “seasoned veteran,” and the person I saw Titanic with last weekend, my fiancée,  I didn’t even know back then.

And I don’t vote for Democrats anymore, either nor am I afraid of guns.

So a few things have changed life in such a short space of time (but I own the same car).

But the ship still sank.  That didn’t change.

And my dislike of the schlocky romance and Leo’s “I’m the King of the World” holler didn’t rub me the wrong way like it did last time.

My empathy for the flapping victims of engineering prowess and arrogance bobbing around in the freezing waters was greater.

Nearer My God to Thee and all I guess.

At the risk of sounding a bit schlocky myself, all we have in life is how we treat others and how we are treated and I guess that’s why, after 15 years, the movie Titanic still makes people laugh, dream, cry, and reflect.

And it’s why I don’t mind James Cameron got $40.00 from us on Saturday night.

 

 

 

 

About Harrison
Owner and operator of Capitol Commentary.